What Would It Take To Be A Writer?

For anyone who’s wondering what they’ve missed on the list of things to be a writer.

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About Freelance Writing

Insist on regular and timely feedback after you’ve sent the subsequent draft with all updates based on the last specified requirements. Do not write for someone who displays signs of being unable to afford you. And once your work is approved, ask for the money.  Ask, “May I have the money now, please?” or be prepared to work for free 😉 (not advisable).

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  1. Write a lot. And blog regularly. You will improve as you proceed. When you become so irresistibly good, there shall be a demand for your handiwork.
  2. Don’t visit Freelancing sites. They are an insult to every writer. Unless you want to bid unreasonably low just to build your reputation. Unless you want a part of your income to be taxed by the site. Unless you want to pay for certification exams. Unless you want to go without projects for days together and end up with a thankless project. Unless you want to give the site your credit card or PayPal details.
  3. Update all your social media statuses – personal, pages and groups –  and descriptions to say that you are interested in Freelancing. Your experience and reputation are established by your blog. You needn’t explain anything more.textgram_1485139323
  4. Search for freelance projects across the social media using the search bar – statuses, pages, and groups. Note down the ones which are relevant and recent.
  5. Mail the person of contact your resume, a 150-word bio and your blog site link or a list of them.
  6. Be patient. But keep applying to different seekers. Some arrow will hit some target.textgram_1485139393
  7. When they respond with an interest in hiring you, make sure they ask for a sample and give your their guidelines and requirements.
  8. Don’t write without research or with prejudice. Be neutral, if not slightly positive. Give citations from valid sources.
  9. Always stick to the ETA. Never over-promise or under-deliver.

Bonus, #10. Insist on regular and timely feedback after you’ve sent the subsequent draft with all updates based on the last specified requirements. Do not write for someone who displays signs of being unable to afford you. And once your work is approved, ask for the money.  Ask, “May I have the money now, please?” or be prepared to work for free 😉 (not advisable).

I hope to write a more descriptive and elaborate blog soon. I’d appreciate it if you let me know if you have any questions or queries regarding this subject.